{New Releases} 1/28/14

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Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century by:Monique W. Morris
Black Stats—a comprehensive guide filled with contemporary facts and figures on African Americans—is an essential reference for anyone attempting to fathom the complex state of our nation. With fascinating and often surprising information on everything from incarceration rates, lending practices, and the arts to marriage, voting habits, and green jobs, the contextualized material in this book will better attune readers to telling trends while challenging commonly held, yet often misguided, perceptions.

A compilation that at once highlights measures of incredible progress and enumerates the disparate impacts of social policies and practices, this book is a critical tool for advocates, educators, and policy makers. Black Stats offers indispensable information that is sure to enlighten discussions and provoke debates about the quality of Black life in the United States today—and help chart the path to a better future.

There are less than a quarter-million Black public school teachers in the U.S.—representing just 7 percent of all teachers in public schools.


Approximately half of the Black population in the United States lives in neighborhoods that have no White residents.


In the five years before the Great Recession, the number of Black-owned businesses in the United States increased by 61 percent.


A 2010 study found that 41 percent of Black youth feel that rap music videos should be more political.
There are no Black owners or presidents of an NFL franchise team.


78 percent of Black Americans live within 30 miles of a coal-fired power plant, compared with 56 percent of White Americans.


Pretty Girls In The VIP by: Daaimah S. Poole

In this hot new novel from Essence® bestselling author Daaimah S. Poole, three women are determined to ride their rich men’s successes to the very top. . .

When her marriage to an NFL phenom ended, so did Adrienne Sheppard’s chance at wealth and security. Now she’s betting on her exclusive new nightclub–and her new man–to turn her luck around. . . Sexy vixen Shanice Whitaker is taking her pay-for-play schemes to a whole new level to stack up the mad fortune of her dreams. . . And Zakiya Lee is sure she knows how to work the sports fame game straight into full-time professional wife-hood with her NBA star. . .

Delilah’s Daughters by:Angela Benson
But Zakiya’s all-access pass to her man isn’t keeping him from straying, or endangering her dreams. Shanice’s exploding stardom is putting all her dirty tricks of the trade under the merciless media spotlight–and her future on the line. And Adrienne’s insatiable greed for having it all right now is blinding her to business-ending secrets. Soon all three will learn the hard way that truly making it on their own will cost more than they bargained for. . .

An inspirational story about the allure of fame and the faith that binds a family forever . . .

Delilah Monroe has done everything in her power to keep her three daughters strong since the death of her husband. And a big part of that connection is their singing group, Delilah’s Daughters. Veronica, Roxanne, and Alisha each have their own unique sense of self, but they all share the dream of Delilah’s Daughters hitting the Billboard charts.

Now, just as they enter the final round of a national talent show, a record producer approaches Veronica with the promise of fame . . . if she goes solo. Then the man Delilah has always leaned on wants more from her than just friendship, and someone from her past comes calling with a shocking secret. Will Delilah be able to hold her family together?

Without Mercy: The Stunning True Story of Race, Crime, and Corruption in the Deep South by: David Beasley
On December 9, 1938, the state of Georgia executed six black men in eighty-one  minutes in  Tattnall Prison’s electric chair. The executions were a record for the state that still stands today. The new prison, built with funds from FDR’s New Deal, as well as the fact that the men were tried and executed rather than lynched were thought to be a sign of progress. They were anything but. While those men were arrested, convicted, sentenced, and executed in as little as six weeks—E. D. Rivers, the governor of the state, oversaw a pardon racket for white killers and criminals, allowed the Ku Klux Klan to infiltrate his administration, and bankrupted the state. Race and wealth were all that determined whether or not a man lived or died. There was no progress. There was no justice.

David Beasley’s Without Mercy is the harrowing true story of the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the violent death throes of the Klan, but most of all it is the story of the stunning injustice of these executions and how they have seared distrust of the legal system into the consciousness of the Deep South, and it is a story that will forever be a testament to the death penalty’s appalling inequality that continues to plague our nation.

BFF’s: Best Frenemies Forever Series by:Brenda Hampton
Kayla, Evelyn, and Trina have been on-and-off-again girlfriends for many years, but the lines of true friendship will be crossed, the knives that go into another friend’s back will cut deep, trust will not apply, and no one will share their dirty little secrets. With enough backstabbing, finger-pointing, and disrespect to go around, this trio sticks to their motto of “What she can do, I can do better;and whatever she has, I want a piece of it too.” Much competition is thrown in the mix, and jealousy is so thick that there will be no place for anyone to run when the mess hits the fan. Only then will they attempt to put their many differences aside, but when severe damage is already done, it may be possible to forgive, but certainly not to forget.

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